Monday, February 22, 2016

Lemon Meringue

For today’s style story, we take a trip back in time, circa the 1940's. I absolutely love the fashion options from that era, and have even thought how amazing it would have been to live back then and to enjoy those fashions firsthand. However, I quickly remember that I am a woman with brown skin, which means that life during that era would have been particularly difficult. You see in this country, people were hated, solely based on the color of their skin. My grandparents lived through that era, and have shared with me the challenges that arose simply because a person was: black. Yes, life would have been much more challenging for me then, than it is today- and I will say: It is still a challenge being a black woman.
It’s been said that hatred is learned; I have witnessed that truth time and time again. For instance, I was standing in line the other day at a store, and I overheard a little boy directly behind me ask his mother: ‘Why are there people with red skin?’ I couldn’t hear his mom's answer, she seemed embarrassed and subsequently mumbled something under her breath. Although I was unable to hear her reply, it brought to my mind another experience that I won’t forget anytime soon.
One afternoon I was sitting leisurely with a family that I had known for a little over a year. They are natives of another country, and as it happens, they do not have brown skin. Their youngest child (age 4) began to ask me a series of question, starting with:  Why are your knees black? Why are your gums dark? Why is your skin different than mine? Why is your hair like that? Do you wish your hair was like mine? As so on... The tone of her questions reflected more than curiosity, instead it was actually a sense of superiority. Despite my shock and discomfort, I answered each of her inquiries as simply and gracefully as possible. However, my thoughts wandered over to her parents, my relationship with them, and the type of people that they must truly be, given the fact that their child felt that her race/features/color indicated that she was superior to me. Also I was shocked and stunned by the obvious: At no point did they interject into our conversation, seizing the opportunity to teach/show her that people come in all shades and sizes, and that we are all equal and beautiful. You see, I am of the belief that parents have a responsibility to teach their children to love and value people of all colors.
With that said, I know that I would not have enjoyed living during the 40's, but fortunately that doesn't mean that I have to miss out entirely on the fabulous styles that stem from that time!
This beauty from Shabby Apple resonated with me, I was siked when they reached out to me and offered me the opportunity to try it out. I must admit I was a bit apprehensive about sizing (as I always am when trying out a new brand), so I ordered this dress in a size 16, hoping that would ensure that I'd have some extra room. However, this dress actually runs small, and fits truer to a petite size 12 in my opinion. Nevertheless, the color, the cut, and the print are gloriously designed and happily take me back to my dream style era.
Please share: What is your dream style era?!

Until next time Style Lovers!
XO


Feather hat: Vintage| Fishnet gloves: Vintage| Dress: Shabby Apple, gifted| Mink stole: Vintage| Shoes: Jessica Simpson

10 comments:

  1. Gorgeous dress. The shape suits you well.


    http://www.afrogenik.com/

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  2. I too love to romanticize the 20s and 40s and I can't tell you the disappointment I experienced when I first moved to NYC in the late 90s. But over time, we overcome. Kudos to you for expanding the knowledge of the small child and hopefully his/her parents. That dress and fur cape are the bees knees!

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    1. We do overcome!! Thank you very much :)

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  3. Hello Joi you are a beautiful black sister. Thanks for sharing your story, I think every black woman has experienced this I know I have.

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    1. Thank you Cre! It's a sad but true reality, we have all have experienced this, and unfortunately- it's ongoing...

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  4. Joi you look beautiful! I visited the website and seeing the dress on the model I would have paid it no attention! You are doing this dress some justice!! Beautifully!

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    1. LOL! Thank you very much! It's amazing what a dose of curves can do ;)

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  5. I am sorry to hear about your interaction with the child and her parents. They could have and should have done better. We still have a long way to go in this world to treat people fairly and equitably. You are a beautiful woman and this outfit is no exception. I admire you for being "you"!

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    1. Thank you very much Erika! I truly look forward to living in a better world.

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